Central African Republic looking for his donut

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Listen to this article: Your browser does not support the audio element. A weeks-long rebel blockade of the main trade route into Central African Republic is disrupting humanitarian aid operations in the country and triggering food shortages and price rises, even as hundreds of thousands of people are fleeing post-electoral conflict.

Some 1, trucks are currently backed up at the Cameroonian border town of Garoua Boulai. Among them are vehicles containing humanitarian supplies — including medicine and food with a shrinking shelf life — that could be used to assist those in need. Analysts say the armed groups — known as the Coalition of Patriots for Change, or the CPC — are attacking the supply road in an attempt to suffocate Bangui and force the government into negotiating with them.

The strategy is having a grave effect on residents in Bangui and in other parts of the landlocked country. Marie-Claire, a mother of seven who sells food at a local market in the capital, told The New Humanitarian she earns three times less than she did before the blockade.

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CPC rebels have since launched attacks on Bangui and captured a of towns in the countryside, triggering an exodus of more thanpeople — nearly half of whom have fled abroad, mainly to neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo. The ambush, which took place roughly 10 kilometres from the Cameroonian border, left three drivers injured and others afraid of taking future trips.

Across the city, dried fish, mushrooms, palm oil, beans, salt, and other basic foodstuffs are becoming harder to find. Informal market workers — mostly women who sell street food — told TNH it has become almost impossible to buy the bulk ingredients they need to make donuts, peanut paste, and other goods. A nationwide state of emergency that began on 22 January has also made life hard. Under new rules, motorbike taxi drivers — omnipresent in Bangui during normal times — have been told to stop working for security reasons.

Without transport, some city residents are forced to walk for hours to get to and from their places of work.

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Residents in rural parts of CAR — where most of the violence is taking place — are also impacted by the diminished imports. The NGO Refugees International called last week on international donors to help establish a humanitarian air bridge to bring supplies into CAR using non-military cargo planes. At a summit last week in Angola, he of states from the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region, a regional body, called for a ceasefire in CAR, and for rebel groups to allow freedom of movement on the corridor. The New Humanitarian is an independent, non-profit newsroom founded in We deliver quality, reliable journalism about crises and big issues impacting the world today.

Our reporting on humanitarian aid has uncovered sex scandals, scams, data breaches, corruption, and much more. Our readers trust us to hold power in the multi-billion-dollar aid sector able and to amplify the voices of those impacted by crises. We keep our journalism free — no paywalls — thanks to the support of donors and readers like you who believe we need more independent journalism in the world. Your contribution means we can continue delivering award-winning journalism about crises.

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Why Is The Central African Republic At War With Itself? - History of CAR 1960-2021

Become a member. about Central African Republic. Environment and Disasters. Aid and Policy. Marie-Claire, a mother of seven who sells food at a local market in Bangui, told TNH she earns three times less than she did before the blockade. Rwandan peacekeepers on a patrol in January just outside of Bangui.

Bangui residents are struggling to find transport around town since motorbike taxi drivers were told to stop working for security reasons. Help make quality journalism about crises possible The New Humanitarian is an independent, non-profit newsroom founded in Related stories Conflict. Politics and Economics. When the life of a person is at stake, the UN should be the prosecutor, not the judge.

Briefing: In Central African Republic, rebels fight on as peace deal falters Interviews with rebel officials, humanitarians, and protest groups suggest the February agreement is now looking shaky and could unravel. Get the latest humanitarian news, direct to your inbox up to receive our original, on-the-ground coverage that informs policymakers, practitioners, donors, and others who want to make the world more humane.

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Central African Republic looking for his donut

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